Citizens for a Livable Cranbrook Society provides grassroots leadership and an inclusive process, with a voice for all community members, to ensure that our community grows and develops in a way that incorporates an environmental ethic, offers a range of housing and transportation choices, encourages a vibrant and cultural life and supports sustainable, meaningful employment and business opportunities.

Friday, August 31, 2012

Full Moon Rising

Moon Over Baker August 30 2012


The moon will be completely full tonight, August 31st and it is a Blue Moon.  A Blue Moon is when a second full moon occurs within one month - an event which only happens about every 2.7 years

Sir Ken Robinson: Bring on the learning revolution!

Thursday, August 30, 2012

What's Happening...

Friday, August 31

Justin Lacroix at the Casino
Montreal musician Justin Lacroix will
be playing at the St. Eugene Casino this evening and
Saturday evening starting at 9am

Saturday, September 1

Cranbrook Farmers Market

Adjacent to Rotary Park on 10th Avenue South.
9am - 1pm
Great locally grown produce, artisans and crafts



Sat Sept 1st. Moyie bluffs – Hike up to the bluffs on the Moyie River upstream from Highway 3. This is one of Lorne’s new hikes in this historic gold mining country. Moderate pace, full day. For info call Lorne  426 – 8864

Saturday September 1st and Sunday September 2nd
Fort Steele
End of season activities
Sheep Shearing and Wool Spinning
Gift Shop Sale
Monday, September 3

Labour Day Picnic
Everyone is invited to the 11th annual
Labour Day Picnic hosted by the East Kootenay
District Labour Council in Rotary Park Cranbrook
From 11am - 4pm. Food concessions, kids activities
Proceeds support the Cranbrook Food Bank and the Cranbrook Women's Group

Monday Sept 3rd (Labour Day). Pedley Pass and Bumpy Meadows – Hike up to and through fascinating Bumpy Meadows and then up a good trail to Pedley Pass in the country just east of  Windermere. Depending on conditions, complete an optional loop ridgewalk back to the trailhead. 1/1/2 , full day  . For info call Ruth  427 – 3761.


Wednesday, September 5

Community Fall Registration

City of Cranbrook Leisure Services offers clubs and
organizations the opportunity to a host a table for a fee of $10
at the Community Fall Registration Event to be held this evening from
6pm-8pm at the Cranbrook Curling Centre.
To do so register at Leisure Service by calling
250-489--2200. Members of the public are invited to attend
to find out about leisure pursuits offered in Cranbrook this Fall and Winter.

Photography Exhibit
Photography Exhibition at the Artrageous Gallery on 10th Avenue South.
Gallery Hours are 11am - 5pm Tuesday to Friday
11am - 3pm on Saturdays.

Wednesday, August 29, 2012

It Was a Slow News Day When Bill Did Speak

Perceptions by Gerry Warner


Well “Kootenay Bill” has done it again and I for one would like to defend him, if not explain him, which is no easy task, but hang on to your seat, I’m going to give it a try.

According to a Canadian Press story this week, our sometimes, misunderstood  MLA, reaching back to the red-baiting , McCarthyism of  the 1950’s, said a fellow MLA was in danger of falling into the clutches of communism because he recently spent a week at a Cuban beach resort.

Here is the quote posted by CP Aug. 28 at 6:18 a.m.  “Sometimes when people are most relaxed, such as after a refreshing holiday in the Caribbean, they are most likely to express their innermost thoughts," said Bennett. "In this case, Jagrup Brar (Surrey-Fleetwood MLA) may well have given us a glimpse into the secret desires of the B.C. NDP caucus." 

Now do you think for one darn moment that our Bill, volatile as he can be sometimes, is seriously suggesting that a week of R&R in Cuba would give anyone a “secret desire” or inclination to become a communist?  Piffle, I say! Close to 300,000 Canadian tourists-a-year travel to Cuba, according to a recent Globe and Mail article, including I dare say, many from Cranbrook. In fact, Canada sends the most tourists to Cuba followed by Britain, Italy and France. The last time I checked none of those countries had suddenly turned communist and I don’t see much prospect of Canada going commie either.

And now, painful as this will be, I must bare my soul and be completely honest with you gentle readers. I hope you’re sitting down for this because I’m about to make one of my darkest revelations. About three years ago – gasp! – I, and my good wife, spent seven sunny days in Cuba. Oh the horror! Just like Kurtz said in “Heart of Darkness,” there are times when you’re touched to the deepest recesses of your soul.
I’d never been to a communist country before and I wasn’t sure what to expect. Would Cubans have curved horns sticking out of their heads? Would the hammer and sickle be flying everywhere? Would there be nightly lectures at the hotel on Karl Marx or Che Guvera? Would I inevitably feel myself sliding into the yoke of communism? Would life ever be the same?  

But you know something, it wasn’t like that. Maybe it was all those free mojitos I drank by the beach. Or maybe it was those turquoise, blue waters flowing over the white sands of Veradaro Beach? And the low prices on anything you bought was very pleasing to a cheap, old, fiscal conservative like me. I almost thought I’d died and gone to that great Wal-Mart in the sky. In fact, I even met a Canadian down there who worked at Wal-Mart.

The Mahatma Gandhi Monument in a park
 on the west side of Havana.
And the Cuban people? You’ve never met friendlier, more self-effacing people in your life. Anxious to please, catering to your every need and proud of their country, but not uncritical of it either if you get to know them well. We had a guide who would often make critical remarks about the Castro regime even though he was also quick to say how much the bearded, communist patriarch had done for the Cuban people and how life had improved since the repressive Baptista regime that preceded Castro.

You may then ask, is Cuba a socialist utopia? Far from it. Just as you might expect, poverty is everywhere. With the exception of China, communism seldom leads to economic growth or a higher standard of living – and worst of all – it never seems to lead to democracy. 

But you know something, if you have your eyes open and ears listening during your Cuban vacation you’ll soon discover that Cubans are not as politically na├»ve as you may think. The internet is seeping into the country. So are TV signals and  news from around the world by shortwave radio. Some Cubans even own smart phones and computers and travel abroad. Try as it might, the Cuban dictatorship can’t keep the free world at bay from the Cuban people and has started to relax the harsh communist system. Cubans are being allowed to buy houses, cars and consumer goods for the first time. The regime is softening. Can democracy be far behind?

Now getting back to “Kootenay Bill” and his ditzy comments. Obviously he didn’t mean what he said. He was just having a little joke on us on a slow news day. That Bill. What a kidder he is. And does he ever know how to grab a cheap headline.

Gerry Warner is a retired journalist and Cranbrook City Councillor. His views are his own and he does not speak for Council.

http://www.ipolitics.ca/2012/08/27/b-c-new-democrat-accused-of-cuba-commie-love/

Urban Bee Keeping

One of the goals for the Armond Theatre Restoration, (Note August '14. This may not be the case any more as plans for the Armond Theatre have changed) is a green roof with hopefully bee hives.   A few things need to happen before this idea will be possible but watching this video may help in understanding the reasons for this goal.  The decline of bees is very noticeable and worrisome to those who work in the field of agriculture and horticulture.  For those who drive for a living or travel a lot it would be like seeing a sudden decline of articulated trucks on the highway.  Bees are the pollen distributors which are essential to much of our food supply.

Blast from the Past - A Scam As Old as Methuselah


Cranbrook Courier November 24th 1922





Tuesday, August 28, 2012

Black Henbane

Jenny Humphrey

I was asked to identify a plant the other day and it was a new one on me.  Despite this unusual and rather nasty character existing in Alberta, Idaho and other areas close to our own, I, nor several others had seen it before.  As this plant, Black Henbane,  can become invasive and as prevention is better than the cure, here is the plant for all to see.  Should you have this plant in your garden, it is best pulled and well composted preferably before the seeds mature as composting does not always destroy mature and viable seed.  If you do have this plant and the seeds are mature, seal in a black plastic bag and place in the sun.  The heat should build up enough to destroy the seeds.  Alternatively the plant could be burned in a safe location.

attractive flower with deep brown red vein pattern

multi branched ungainly plant

hardened and viscious calyxes which hold the seed pod

hairy leaves which have no stems

immature seeds - seeds turn brown/ black when ripe
http://www.invasiveplants.ab.ca/Downloads/FS-BlackHenbane.pdf

Monday, August 27, 2012

Ktunaxa Nation Council Purchases Cranbrook Central School

So begins another chapter in the life of Central School.  This grand old building has been sold to the Ktunaxa Nation Council and the community can look forward to seeing it come alive once more.  This building is well known to many long time Cranbrook residents – those who went to school there and those who worked there as part of Crestbrook and Tembec.  Now, only a small number of Canfor employees remain in their rented basement space until the Ktunaxa Nation take possession at the beginning of October.

Cranbrook Central School was in operation as a school from 1909 until 1983, when it was in dire need of many upgrades and the need for a school as large, in that location, was not required.  Pinewood School had been built as a replacement and most of Cranbrook’s students were not living within walking distance of this school any more.  Crestbrook Forest Industries was in need of a larger building at that time and so the school was literally swapped for their offices in the Industrial Park.  Crestbrook also received a $300,000.00 payment to make up the difference in property value.  Crestbrook Forest Industries spent over a million and a half dollars in 1984 on a renovation project preserving an important heritage feature of the community.  The finished corporate headquarters was opened to the public in May of 1985.  A year later it received a Heritage Society of BC Award but to this day has not received a City of Cranbrook Heritage Designation.

Cranbrook Central School was originally built in 1909 after demand from the public and some hand wringing.  An addition was built in 1922.

From February 4th 1909 Cranbrook Herald

Click to enlarge


Sunday, August 26, 2012

The Faces of the Dog Show


Moir Park was a busy place this weekend with many campers and motor homes parked to house and protect the stars of the Cranbrook and District Annual Kennel Club Dog Show.

A Few of the Stars





Bored or just showing off the good teeth?


Saturday, August 25, 2012

To Market To Market to Buy a Fat Pig

Today is Farmer's Market Day and sometimes there really are some fantastical pigs to be found.  This was an improvisation of Three Little Pigs for the younger market goers.







Friday, August 24, 2012

Bringing the Light to Rural Ethiopia, a Doctor’s Story

Perceptions by Gerry Warner
What makes good people do extraordinary good things? Not just good things that you’d expect good people to do, but things that are truly extraordinary. You may be thinking, why am I posing such a question.  Let me tell you why.
Mark this date on your calendar if you will.

On Monday evening  Aug. 27 at 7 p.m. at the College of the Rockies lecture theatre (Rm. 250), Dr. James Guzek, an ophthalmologist from Richland, Washington, will be speaking and making a Power Point presentation on his work conducting free cataract surgery in rural Ethiopia.

Much like our own Dr. Bob Cutler, who’s been conducting free medical clinics in rural Haiti for years, Guzek is now in his third year of doing cataract clinics in a remote part of western Ethiopia, a country of more than 85 million with a long history that some believe goes back to the Garden of Eden.

I met Dr. Guzek when I participated in Cranbrook’s Sunrise Rotary Club’s  “Pedal for Polio” fundraiser in June when he addressed a large crowd of Rotarians at the organization’s spring conference  in Richland. He’s a very eloquent speaker and totally engaged the crowd with his presentation and I’m sure he’ll do the same here.

I’ve since done a bit of research on Ethiopia which is an ancient country with a history almost as long as Egypt and has some fascinating connections to Western culture even though it’s far from the main centres of Western civilization. It would probably surprise many of you to know that Ethiopians share the same faith that many Canadians do with close to half the population Christian and a third Muslim and many other smaller denominations. With a volatile mix of cultures and ethnic groups, Ethiopia has been racked with violence and war throughout its history yet it’s one of the few African countries that almost completely escaped colonization by the West except for a brief occupation by Italy prior to World War II. Ethiopia is the source of the mighty Nile River and is largely agrarian but very poor with an annual average income of less than $1,000-a-year and a literacy rate of about 30 per cent.

Despite these somewhat grim statistics Ethiopia has the second largest non-oil economy in Africa and its economy has been growing rapidly in recent years and tourists are beginning to flock to the country with its unique mix of cultures, wildlife and scenery. It also has a surprisingly pleasant, high altitude climate with much of the country lying on a high plateau over 6,000 feet close to the equator. Addis Ababa, the capital at 2,440 meters (8,850 feet) is almost as high as Mt. Fisher and features everything from mud huts to glitzy hotels and Medieval cathedrals. No wonder the tourists are coming!

But Dr. Guzek’s work is conducted far from all this in Dembi Dolo, a small farming city in dusty west Ethiopia far from the rapidly modernizing metropolis of Addis Ababa . The clinic, staffed by local nurses and one visiting Ethiopian ophthalmologist, is not literally “free” thanks to fundraising by Rotarians in the Tri-Cities area. But thanks to Dr. Guzek’s efforts and other volunteers the curse of blindness in the developing world is being lifted and light is literally being brought to a part of the world that needs it most.

Dr. Guzek talks of an Ethiopian mother, who because of cataracts raised two of her children without ever seeing them. “She had four children that she had nursed and diapered without ever seeing two of them. Can you imagine how she felt when she could see them? ”Imagine her feeling indeed. I think all of us would be hard pressed to do that.
Yet, like this part of the world including Canada and the U.S., one of the main medical problems in Ethiopia is getting physicians, especially specialists, to practice in rural areas. Obviously the needed support facilities aren’t there. Nor is the money and resources, a familiar refrain heard even in the developed world. As a result, Dr. Guzek, in conjunction with Ethiopian specialists is involved in a unique project to train local Ethiopian nurses to do some cataract surgery themselves, thus bringing “the light” to where it has not been brought before.

It’s a fascinating story and one that you can experience for yourself at COTR Monday. As for why a physician like Dr. Guzek would leave the comfort of his home practice to do this, you’ll have to ask him yourself.

Gerry Warner is a retired journalist and Cranbrook City Councillor. His views are his own and he does not speak for Council.

Thursday, August 23, 2012

Fort Steele Summer Camp

There is only one more week of Summer Camp left at Fort Steele.  Activity has varied from week to week and here participants are given a refreshment break and a taste of home grown garden pleasures, Victorian style.   Gardens are looked after by volunteers at Fort Steele.  Their reward is the produce they grow and generously share.

Understanding the garden



Jordyn and Lauren with their camp participants

What's Happening...

Friday, August 24















Cranbrook and District Kennel Club
Friday August 24 2012 - to Sun. August 26 2012
Moir Park, Cranbrook
http://www.dogshow.ca/336?club=Cranbrook-and-District-Kennel-Club

Bungay at the Airport
Tom Bungay will be the Summer Artists Showcase
musician entertaining at the Canadian Rockies
International Airpot today from 10am - noon

Mike Stenhouse at the Casino
Mike will be the performer tonight and Saturday night
at the St. Eugene Casino. Show starts at 9pm

Saturday, August 25


















EK Outdoor Club
Full day hike to Jumbo Pass.
Great views of the high Purcells, glaciers, and ice fields.
Call Gary at 250-426-8704

Farmer's Market
Adjacent to Rotary park
9:00am -1:00pm

Monday, August 27

The Gift of Sight
Dr. James Guzek who has worked with Rotary International
to cure blindness in people suffering from cataracts in Sri Lanka,
Ghana, and Ethiopia will give a talk; The Gift of Sight-Healing the Blind
in Ethiopia.
7pm, College of the Rockies Lecture Theatre

Tuesday, August 28

Air Cadets 552 Squadron Cranbrook
Open House and Welcome Back
6pm-8pm
For more information please contact Capt. Bott at 250-426-3685
or email trainingdesk552@gmail.com

Wednesday August 29th
Final Wild West Wednesday of the season
Fort Steele
Call 250.417.6000 for tickets




Wednesday, August 22, 2012

Final Summer Evening Market Tonight

The final evening market of the summer is TONIGHT!

The Paper Garden with much more than paper!

Reception at Cranbrook and District Arts Council Gallery


A reception was recently held for the photographers exhibiting at the Artrageous Gallery on Tenth Avenue.  The Arts Council is currently accepting photographs of art work (any genre) for their 2013 calendar.  A selection will be chosen from those contributed.  The gallery also has for sale, The Kootenays Art Calendar for 2013, featuring work by Joseph Cross and Caprice Hogg as well as other Kootenay artists.  Proceeds to the Arts Council.

Look for these calendars at the evening Farmer's Market tonight.

Photographer Vic Panei  from Columbia Lake and grandchildren


Monday, August 20, 2012

Incredible Edible

The movement is here - there is no denying that.  The edible garden tour a few days ago in Kimberley, the Farmer's Market and Cranbrook's own Public Produce Garden. The increasing numbers of those who put into practise sustainable ways of living is exciting and encouraging for the future.

Sunday, August 19, 2012

Saturday, August 18, 2012

Dogs with Jobs

Dogs are always happier and better behaved when they know they have a job, just like humans.  If a dog is not given a function in a household they will create one and sometimes that means becoming aggressive or depressed.  The wonderful thing about dogs is that if they know they are valued, even if it is simply being your companion (not easy with some humans) they pay you back big time with unconditional love and loyalty.

Very Happy Dogs

This is Buddy who relishes being a human companion and he loves to take his owner Sydney to the Farmer's Market.

Here is Ruby who willingly carries her hiking companion's gear even though she is not allowed in the best restaurants.

Buddy works at the Bottle depot and takes his job very seriously even to extent of taking the job home with him.

Friday, August 17, 2012

How Other Cities Handle Their History

Our post on the heritage status of Central School has flushed out some interesting comments.  A simple Google search will quickly indicate how other cities handle their buildings with historical value.  Below are two samples.  It would seem there is not much to be afraid of by designating and publicly recognising a building as heritage.  In fact it should be an honour.  We need to ask ourselves how it must look to those who might consider living here if that value is not recognised.

Saskatoon
Municipal Heritage Properties are recognized as being of major significance to the history of our community.  The buildings represent almost every time period in Saskatoon’s history. 

The Heritage Conservation Program provides for financial incentives to owners of municipal heritage property for costs related to restoration of architectural elements of the building. 

Kelowna
The City of Kelowna values, respects and celebrates our built, cultural and natural heritage as a major contributor to our community's identity, character and sense of place. 

Kelowna
The Official Community Plan and the Heritage Procedures Bylaw No. 7776 set out the City's heritage management regulations for development. 

Council has appointed a statutory committee, the 
Community Heritage Committee, to advise on heritage matters in the City.

The City also annually allocates funds to the Kelowna Heritage Grants Program, which is a registered society that provides grants to homeowners for heritage restoration and education/awareness projects.  To view the grant guidelines and application form, see the
Heritage Grants Program package.


and this link was sent to us by a reader.

http://www.thunderbay.ca/Living/culture_and_heritage/Heritage_Properties/Heritage_Advisory_Committee.htm

Mining B.C.’s Forests for Ruin and Profit

Perceptions by Gerry Warner
So the solution to the B.C. forest industry crisis is to cut more timber, according to the report of the Special Committee on Timber Supply released in Victoria this week. Who can deny now that the fox is in charge of the hen house when it comes to forest management in our once verdant province?
Oh, I know “Supernatural  B.C,”  the “best place on earth” according to the current government,  is still largely green. But take a flight to Vancouver sometime and a different picture emerges. When you look out the window you don’t exactly see a sea of green like the glossy tourist brochures say. What you see is a sea of clear-cuts from one end of the province to the other.  North/south, east/west, it doesn’t matter . The pock-marked landscape runs virtually from the city limits of Cranbrook to Vancouver and when you fly over Vancouver Island, it’s the same sickening scene only worse.
Not a pretty sight and it’s there for a reason.
For over 100 years, we’ve been mining -- not logging -- the once magnificent woods of  B.C. And when you mine a material it’s gone. You don’t get it back. It’s been the same with logging in this besotted province. What were the first trees logged shortly after Captain Vancouver sailed down the West Coast? Old growth Douglas firs that used to soar straight as an arrow more than 200 feet high at the corner of Hastings and Granville and up and down the coast.
The British Navy, then the greatest navy on earth, found those Douglas fir logs to be perfect for spars on their sailing ships and handy for building forts and stockades to keep the indigenous people at bay. And by the time steam came and sail boats were a thing of the past, those same Douglas firs were used to build homes for the settlers that flooded into Vancouver, Victoria and the rest of the province . And it also made fortunes for lumber barons like H. R. MacMillan and hundreds of others who became rich as our patrimony was ripped from the ground and used all over the province and exported around the world, especially to the U.S., which had already ravaged its timber resources and now Asia where the forests were cut eons ago.
Are you getting the picture?
We haven’t been “logging” the forest in the conventional sense of the term which implies forest stewardship to ensure there will always be trees to log. We’ve been clear-cutting almost every last tree for quick profit and letting nature take care of the future. Don’t believe me? Well consider a key report recommendation that suggests more use of  “marginally economic forest types.”  Why do we have to turn to the margins of B.C.’s once great forest lands when we once possessed the greatest temperate rain forest on earth?
It can be difficult for the average layman to appreciate this because when you look out your window almost anywhere in B.C. you see trees. But most of those trees are already committed to the major timber companies in the province or not considered commercial to log.
And why have we fallen into this quicksand of forestry woe? We waste almost as much timber as we log

Logging slash (waste) on Bugaboo Creek Aug. 3, 2012. 
and this has left us in a silvicultural hole bigger than some of the open pit mines in the province.
If you want more proof  look at the report’s admission that we’ve fallen so far back in recent years in keeping forest inventory that we can’t even make a reasonable estimate of  how many trees we’ve got left. And if you’re looking to apportion blame, it’s not just the current government. It’s all provincial governments for the past hundred years that have taken a three blind mice approach to forestry.
And don’t fall for the line that we can blame it all on the pine beetle epidemic. Yes, there’s a pine beetle crisis out there, but that was a crisis largely of our own making because for years we’ve planted primarily pine beetle in areas that were better suited for other species.
In response to the all-party report, Forests Minister Steve Thomson says he’s going to come up with an “action plan” within a week. I say to Mr. Thomson with respect that he’s dreaming in Technicolor if he thinks a solution to 100 years of abusing the forest can be found in a week.

Gerry Warner is a retired journalist and Cranbrook City Councillor. His views are his own and he does not speak for Council.

Thursday, August 16, 2012

Investigation of Heritage Status for Central School Not Supported by Two Councillors



During the August 13 Council Meeting there was an enquiry about why Central School, 1909, now the Tembec Building, does not have heritage status considering it is one of Cranbrook’s oldest and most respected buildings. Director Hale indicated there needed to be a nomination for that building to go the list and then the nomination would go to Council for potential inclusion in the Bylaw.

A motion was made to refer this issue to administration and the Heritage Committee for further investigation. Councillors Pallesen and Scott voted against this motion.  The motion did pass but it is hard to understand why two city councillors would not support a motion such as this.  Cranbrook has lost many of its heritage buildings or they have been altered beyond recognition.  Our historic buildings are the places that remind us of where we have been and who we are. By receiving this designation a building receives protection from major change or alteration without considerable process.  The building was lovingly restored in 1984 but isn’t it time this grand old building received what it deserves - recognition of its heritage value to the community?

What's Happening...

Friday, August 17

Cranbrook Pro Rodeo
Friday, Saturday, and Sunday afternoon
Wycliffe Exhibition Grounds
Events start at 6:30pm Friday and Saturday
2pm on Sunday
Concessions and a beer garden
Tickets are $20 at the gate or $18 in advance
Advance Tickets are available from Alpine Toyota.
Top Crop, or Hill Billy Hardwear

Tom Bungay at the Casino
Tom will be playing at the Weekend Showcase
St. Eugene Casino Friday and Saturday, 9pm

Saturday, August 18

EK Outdoor Club, Sat Aug 18th – Hike a mining road west of the Bull River. About 5km and some 600 feet elevation gain. Full day. For info Lorne 250-426-8864
http://ekoutdoorclub.wordpress.com/summer-hiking-schedule-2012/

Cranbrook Farmers Market
10th Avenue South, near Rotary Park
9am-1pm
Amazing produce, foods, and artisans

Wednesday, August 22

Final Cranbrook Night Farmers Market of the Summmer
10th Avenue South and Rotary Park
5pm-8:30pm with dozens of vendors and entertainment


Tuesday, August 14, 2012

Post Notes for the Council meeting of August 13 2012

Invocation
It is customary before each meeting of council to have an invocation.  At this meeting the call for support was given by Reverend Ron Short.
Comment 
The Fire and Brimstone presented at this meeting seemed entirely out of place, inappropriate, exclusive and unwelcoming to this member of the audience.  Readers can form their own opinion by watching the video of the meeting on the City's website.
http://vimeo.com/47534800

 Delegation 

5.1 Chris Ayling of Cranbrook Connected Update

Chris Ayling accompanied by Dana Osiowy gave an overview of Cranbrook Connected ongoing work.  Dana Osiowy has been hired by the City to oversee the implementation of the Integrated Sustainability or Cranbrook Connected Plan.  Ayling felt many goals had been achieved including a local media campaign. A record of the work completed by Dana Osiowy will be on the Cranbrook Connected website later this week.

Council Enquiries

Councillor Warner had two enquiries from the public.
One regarded when road work was to begin. Engineer Hodge answered that road work on designated roads was to begin by the end of this week.

The second enquiry concerned the Heritage Status of the old Central School, now Tembec Building.  This building does not have heritage status.  A motion was made to refer this item back to administration for more 
information and procedure.  Councillors Scott and Pallesen voted against this.

7.1 Administration Updates
https://cranbrook.civicweb.net/Documents/DocumentList.aspx?ID=2444

CAO Staudt reported on the following items.

Tim Hortons raised approximately $11,500 at the 2 Cranbrook locations. 4 Cranbrook children were able to attend camp.  Tim Hortons partners with Big Brothers and Sisters for this camp.

Community Builder of the Year Committee - challenges attracting volunteers for this committee.
Discussion followed this item as the city had advertised for volunteers for the committee on several occasions.  It was felt by Councillor Pallesen that maybe the responsibility for choosing the Community Builder of the Year should go to the Chamber of Commerce.  It was eventually decided to award the job to the Cranbrook Connected Committee.


Public Works estimates that the labour cost to the department due to the storm were $22920.  Public Works received 220 calls for tree pickup by August 1. The Cranbrook Golf Club lost 173 trees
Approximately 590 insurance industry claims were made by local residences and businesses in the 10 days following the storm Claims could reach $2 million.

EBA Engineering undertook field work to complete a Dam Safety Review of the Phillips Dam and the Joseph Creek Dam.   More extensive work is required. Public Works does not have the professional skill set or qualifications to undertake even a preliminary assessment of slope stability.

Taxation Impact on Major Industrial Properties - UCBM has commissioned a  study to assess the impact of property taxation on business decisions. There are no major industrial properties within the City of Cranbrook city limits.

Rails to Trails Advisory Committee has formally created a Society. The intent of the society will be taking on the day to day maintenance of the facility.

Mixed Martial Arts event to take place at the RexPlex September 8, 2012

Community Produce Garden - installation of irrigation pipes and perimeter fencing is complete. The public is invited to attend the open work bees on Tuesday nights, from 7-9pm, throughout the summer

New Library Hours changing on Sept. 4, 2012 to be open 7 days a week and 5 nights a week.
M-F 9am-8pm
Sat. 9am-5pm
Sun. 12pm-5pm

The city has applied a for a grant for a washroom renovation in the library.


 Correspondence

9.1 UBCM ALC Changes Agricultural Land Commission Changes including measure to better protect farmland and to generate more revenue.
9.2 Pre-budget Consult -Federal Govern. Budget Consultation
9.3 UBCM Community Forum Program
9.4 Climate Action Program
9.5 ANKORS - 13th Annual Aids Walk on Sunday Sept. 16
9.6 Request for Food Drive - Church of Latter Day Saints request a food drive starting on August 16
9.7 Parking Issues
9.8 Mountain View Parking Issues - Mountain View requesting No Parking signs be installed on 23rd Ave. North and for the No Parking to be in effect all year.
9.9 Breastfeeding Week - Request for Proclamation
9.10 International Day of Peace - Request for Proclamation

Business Arising

10.1 Privatization Liquor Outlets - Resolution that the City of Cranbrook write a letter to Minister Margaret MacDiarmid, opposing the privatization of the LDB with copies to Premier Clark and EK MLA Bill Bennett.
This issue was also reported under the previous post. 
Councillor Pallesen speaking as a business owner was not in favour of this letter.  Both she and Councillor Scott voted against the resolution which did pass.

10.2 UBCM Conference
Mayor Stetski reported that the Mayors of medium size communities will gather on the Monday of UBCM week to discuss common problems such as infrastructure and need for funding.

New Business

12.1 Mayor's Brown Bag Lunch July 17
https://cranbrook.civicweb.net/Documents/DocumentList.aspx?ID=2457
The future of the old electrical building behind City Hall was discussed.
Comment
More history of that building has since been revealed and a decision will be made soon as to its future.  There is a previous post on that building on this blog.
http://livablecranbrook.blogspot.ca/2012/07/what-to-do.html

Tembec/Central School - Catherine Myer suggested the City partner with some sort of business to retain this important building for all citizens to enjoy.

12.2 Key City Theatre Community Day
12.3 Proposed Boundary Expansion - request by the owner of land located at 1701 - 17th Street South to be included within the City of Cranbrook boundaries.
This resolution passed but not without considerable debate about the piecemeal inclusion of properties into the city.  This process will be reviewed in the OCP review process.

12.4 Highway 3-95 Committee - Recommendation to adopt the terms of reference
This Committee will look into potential and extra improvements to the Highway 3-95 corridor.
Councillor Davis could not accept the terms of reference as presented as he felt more business representation need to be on this committee.  An amendment to increase the committee number to 10 was passed and the amended resolution carried.

12.5 Downtown Commercial Development Permit - Recommendation to approve a Permit to enable redevelopment of property located at 40-12 Avenue North.
This involves the little brown house with the distinct roof line across from the library.
12.6 Development Variance Permit Selkirk Signs - Recommendation for relaxation of Bylaw to decrease the required rear yard setback.
Approved
12.7 Aquifer Protection Development Permit Selkirk Signs
12.8 Industrial Development Permit Selkirk Signs
These last two recommendations were tabled for more review.
12.9 Parks and Opens Spaces
Maryse Leroux has developed a commemorative plaque policy for use in City Parks.  The edifice in Rotary Park was designed to be the backdrop for such plaques and when nominations are made they will need to adhere to the new policy.

By-Laws

13.1 Bylaws 3740 DDC's. Second and third readings
Amended and passed.
13.2 Bylaws 3744 Solid Waste
The bag limit has now been reduced to three.  Councillor Pallesen commented she was pleased it had been increased form the initial recommendation of two.  It was also pointed out that extra bag tags could be purchased at City Hall for $1.50



Councillor Pallesen Offends Gallery with her Statement

On the agenda at last evening's Council Meeting was this item:
10.1 Privatization Liquor Outlets - Resolution that the City of Cranbrook write a letter to Minister Margaret MacDiarmid, opposing the privatization of the LDB with copies to Premier Clark and EK MLA Bill Bennett.

Councillor Warner had defended the motion and given several reasons why he was opposed to the privatization of some liquor warehouses. One of the many reasons was the threat to employment and likely replacement with minimum wage jobs in the private sector.  Councillor Pallesen while referring to information supplied by MLA Bennett, had given the reasons why she felt liquor distribution should be handled by the private sector and then she said,

"I'm of the opinion that if they might lose their jobs, maybe they aren't doing their job"

A stunned gallery responded with boos and cries of "Shame".  Mayor Stetski immediately recovered order with use of the gavel but this was not the only incident at this meeting which left the gallery aghast.


Monday, August 13, 2012

Free Wheelin' Dylan Came to Town

and it was terrific! Lucky us.


City of Cranbrook Advance Council Notes for the Meeting of August 13, 6:00pm

 Delegation 

5.1 Chris Ayling of Cranbrook Connected Update

7.1 Administration Updates

Tim Hortons raised approximately $11,500 at the 2 Cranbrook locations. 4 Cranbrook children were able to attend camp

Community Builder of the Year Committee - challenges attracting volunteers for this committee

Public Works estimates that the labour cost to the department due to the storm were $22920.  Public Works received 220 calls for tree pickup by August 1. The Cranbrook Golf Club lost 173 trees
Approximately 590 insurance industry claims were made by local residences and businesses in the 10 days following the storm Claims could reach $2 million.

EBA Engineering undertook field work to complete a Dam Safety Review of the Phillips Dam and the Joseph Creek Dam.   More extensive work is required. Public Works does not have the professional skill set or qualifications to undertake even a preliminary assessment of slope stability.

Taxation Impact on Major Industrial Properties - UCBM has commissioned a  study to assess the impact of property taxation on business decisions. There are no major industrial properties within the City of Cranbrook city limits.

Rails to Trails Advisory Committee has formally created a Society. The intent of the society will be taking on the day to day maintenance of the facility.

Mixed Martial Arts event to take place at the RexPlex September 8, 2012

Community Produce Garden - installation of irrigation pipes and perimeter fencing is complete. The public is invited to attend the open work bees on Tuesday nights, from 7-9pm, throughout the summer

New Library Hours changing on Sept. 4, 2012 to be open 7 days a week and 5 nights a week.
M-F 9am-8pm
Sat. 9am-5pm
Sun. 12pm-5pm

The city has applied a for a grant for a washroom renovation in the library.


 Correspondence

9.1 UBCM ALC Changes Agricultural Land Commission Changes including measure to better protect farmland and to generate more revenue.
9.2 Pre-budget Consult -Federal Govern. Budget Consultation
9.3 UBCM Community Forum Program
9.4 Climate Action Program
9.5 ANKORS - 13th Annual Aids Walk on Sunday Sept. 16
9.6 Request for Food Drive - Church of Latter Day Saints request a food drive starting on August 16
9.7 Parking Issues
9.8 Mountain View Parking Issues - Mountain View requesting No Parking signs be installed on 23rd Ave. North and for the No Parking to be in effect all year.
9.9 Breastfeeding Week - Request for Proclamation
9.10 International Day of Peace - Request for Proclamation

Business Arising

10.1 Privatization Liquor Outlets - Resolution that the City of Cranbrook write a letter to Minister Margaret MacDiarmid, opposing the privatization of the LDB with copies to Premier Clark and EK MLA Bill Bennett.
10.2 UBCM Conference

New Business

12.1 Mayor's Brown Bag Lunch July 17
12.2 Key City Theatre Community Day
12.3 Proposed Boundary Expansion - request by the owner of land located at 1701 - 17th Street South to be included within the City of Cranbrook boundaries
12.4 Highway 3-95 Committee - Recommendation to adopt the terms of reference
12.5 Downtown Commercial Development Permit - Recommendation to approve a Permit to enable redevelopment of property located at 40-12 Avenue North.
12.6 Development Variance Permit Selkirk Signs - Recommendation for relaxation of Bylaw to decrease the required rear yard setback.
12.7 Aquifer Protection Development Permit Selkirk Sighs
12.8 Industrial Development Permit Selkirk SIgns
12.9 Parks and Opens Spaces

By-Laws

13.1 Bylaws 3740 DDC's
13.2 Bylaws 3744 Solid Waste



Sunday, August 12, 2012

Look Up and Into the Alpine

photos courtesy Bob Whetham

With the late retreat of snow, wild flowers are all blooming simultaneously in the alpine.  It's a great weekend to go and admire the beauty.


Avalanche or Glacier Lily
Paintbrush

Mountain or Silky Phacelia

Monkey Flower