Citizens for a Livable Cranbrook Society provides grassroots leadership and an inclusive process, with a voice for all community members, to ensure that our community grows and develops in a way that incorporates an environmental ethic, offers a range of housing and transportation choices, encourages a vibrant and cultural life and supports sustainable, meaningful employment and business opportunities.

Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Scary Quotes for Hallowe’en



After the second presidential debate, moderator Candy Crowley said, "Climate change -- I had that question, all you climate change people. We just -- you know, again, we knew that the economy was still the main thing, so you knew you kind of wanted to go with the economy." http://www.huffingtonpost.com/nathan-currier/climate-change_b_2032363.html

Christy Clark , "I try never to go over there. Because it's sick. It's a sick culture. All they can think about is government and there are no real people in Victoria, and you get captured by this insidethebeltway debate, and it's really unhealthy."
http://www.timescolonist.com/news/Premier+Christy+Clark+shows+disdain+sick+culture+Victoria/7264806/story.html#ixzz2AckSzAdA 
And then......http://thetyee.ca/News/2012/10/23/Northern-Gateway-Protest/

Brian Hutchinson: B.C. Premier says women ‘too busy’ to support her.

What with “preparing meals” and “helping their kids with their homework,” she has said, women don’t have time to think much about politics. They’ll say what they have to say to get suppertime telephone canvassers off their backs. “Women are very, very busy — focused on work and our family lives and paying the bills at home,” she told reporters on Saturday, when asked why women aren’t more supportive of her. They’ll come around once the election draws nearer, she thinks.

 http://fullcomment.nationalpost.com/2012/10/29/by-brian-hutchinson-b-c-premier-says-women-too-busy-to-support-her/ 

Townsman 
There are now only two underground coal mines left in the country- one on Vancouver Island and the other in Alberta.
Bill Bennett, MLA Kootenay East,  "It makes no sense to invest tax dollars in training underground coal mine workers before we know we have an underground coal mine."
http://www.dailytownsman.com/

Monday, October 29, 2012

The Proof in Sandy


Bob Sandford McKim Auditorium
Two internationally known speakers gave a series of different lectures in Cranbrook and Kimberley last week.  ‘Storm Warning’, ‘Cold Matters’ and a ‘World Prematurely Damned’ were the topics  discussed by Bob Sandford.

Deborah Harford presented 'Climate Change Impacts' and 'Key Principles for Adaptation'.


Deborah Harford

Despite a much greater awareness, there is still a lot to learn about the potential effects of Climate Change.  As the East Coast prepares itself for hurricane Sandy, businesses, municipalities, health and emergency services, and individual home owners are all likely asking themselves what else they can do to be prepared.  

Most important will be the adaptations necessary to cope with higher sea levels, storm surges, extra heavy rain and snowfalls, accompanying floods, run-off and drought. These weather events have always been part of our climate but all these events are now happening with more severity and more frequency.

Water may not always be available where and when we need it.  We will have too much at times and too little at other times.  The effects of the these rapid changes on flora and fauna are already having a major impact on the economy, the pine beetle epidemic for example, thought partly to be a result of climate change, has wreaked havoc with industry and livelihoods.

The need to consider flood zones when buying a home, the necessity of greater storm sewer capacity construction, water storage for times of drought and the results of the elimination of farmland due to permanent flooding.   The cost of these changes will impact us all.  Harford spoke of the debate going on with insurance companies and governments. Governments continue to collect our taxes but do not often share responsibility for damage due to sewer back up, for example, caused by inadequate infrastructure.  Municipalities receive such a small share of federal and provincial taxes that municipal taxes alone are inadequate to upgrade infrastructure to new and necessary standards (if the standards can be known with such unpredictability and lack of stable weather patterns).  Our home insurance rates will go up especially in municipalities with inadequate infrastructure.

Along with focus on the changes necessary to prevent more serious effects of climate change, adaptations are necessary now.  Although these serious messages can be daunting both speakers emphasised that there are solutions which need to be explored and put into practise.
The principle behind much of the change and unpredictability  in precipitation events
For more on Bob’s lecture topics
http://watercanada.net/author/bsandford/

For information from ACT go to:

 For more information from Columbia Basin Trust go to:
www.cbt.org./dialoguetoaction


At Mt Baker School

COR







Sunday, October 28, 2012

Out and About

Thank you to Sally Passey and Stewart Wilson for the photos

at Jim Smith Lake

Joseph Creek 

12th Avenue Mural

Friday, October 26, 2012

A Nation Divided Goes into a Critical Election

Perceptions by Gerry Warner

Having just returned from a two-week sojourn in the U.S., I couldn’t help but notice some factors that I’m sure will play heavily in determining the occupant of the oval office for the next four years.

The Great Recession is much more obvious south of the 49th parallel than north of it. Boarded up gas stations, empty storefronts and motels with shuttered doors were a common sight on my route south to the Grand Canyon which admittedly traversed the rural heartland which has been hardest hit by the economic downturn. Reflecting this, prices are incredibly low like the casino/motel I stayed in Nevada for $35-a-night and they gave you $5 cash to play the slots! (I used it to buy breakfast.)  
Gas was anywhere from $3.69 to $4.19 for regular, still cheaper than Canada, but while I was there gas spiked to more than $5-a-gallon in southern California and motorists were howling. But the recession is the best card in Romney’s deck even though blame could just as easily be laid at George Bush’s door as Obama’s. Unnecessary wars cost a lot of money.

And there are other signs of Americans’ frustration. “Proudly made in America, not China,” was one sign I saw over a vendor’s stall. “We really appreciate your business,” was another one I saw at more than one gas station where I fueled up. And gas is cheaper at some stations if you pay cash.

Americans are proud people and I’m sure their angst is running deep as they look over their shoulders at the economic behemoth of China getting ready to surpass them as the greatest economic power on earth. CBC Radio ran an interesting item just before I left pointing out that for the first time in history the average Canadian family is worth more than its counterpart in the U.S. Of course, there are still far greater personal fortunes south of the border than here, but that’s largely confined to the infamous “one per cent” and does nothing to diminish the anger on Main Street as opposed to the plutocrats of  Wall Street.

Having said this, I must also say something else. I’ve travelled quite a lot in recent years and nowhere have I been better treated than I was in the United States. Whether it was at a gas station , a restaurant, a motel or hiking on the trail people were genuinely friendly and service standards were outstanding. It doesn’t matter where you go in the States, when the waitress comes over to get your order, she has a cold glass of ice water in her hand as well as a menu. That may not sound like much, but it seldom happens here. And if you say you’re from Canada, their eyes really light up. I even met two older American couples that said they were considering retiring in the Great White North though the possible election of Romney may have had something to do with that.

And yes, the election. I did sense that many Americans are war-weary, but maybe my own bias had something to do with that.  Ironically, one of the best cards in Obama’s deck was his extra-judicial order to murder Osama bin Laden instead of capturing him and putting him on trial as a war criminal like you’d expect any civilized, law-abiding country to do. I guess after 9/11 that’s a forlorn hope.
Another thing that’s obvious down south is they’re a deeply divided country. It’s right in your face wherever you go – rural/urban, liberal/conservative, rich/poor  – you can’t avoid it. Who was it that said “two nations feuding in the bosom of  a single state?” That’s what it’s like down there. The twain doesn’t meet, at least politically

But it’s still a great nation and they know how to treat their guests. I’d go back in a heartbeat.

Gerry Warner is a retired journalist. His opinions are his own.


       

Thursday, October 25, 2012

What's Happening...

Thursday, October 25

CHCA Thrift Store Fashion Show
Prestige Hotel starting at 6pm
Tickets are $25 and include a complimentary drink and appetizers.

Friday October 26

Weekend Showcase at St. Eugene Mission
Featuring Tom Bungay
Starting at 9pm

Saturday, October 27

Garage Sale at Northstar GM
Fundraiser BBQ for the COTH Team Avalanche
9am-1pm

Fort Steele
Hallowe'en Spooktacular
4:00pm - 9:00pm
Limited Tickets
Cranbrook - Safeway, Save On Foods and Chamber of Commerce
Non-members $13 Members $11

Monday, October 29

Flu Clinic at Shoppers Drug Mart
Tamarack Mall from 10am-5pm

Wednesday, October 31

Flu Clinic at Shoppers Drug Mart
Tamarack Mall from 10am-5pm

Trick or Treat at Tamarack Mall
Bring you dressed up youngsters to the Mall
3:30pm-5:30pm

Wednesday, October 24, 2012

Defend Our Coast











About 35 people came out today to meet in from of MLA Bennett's Cranbrook office on this day of action to Defend Our Coast.    Both Adrienne Campbell who organised this event and Kathryn Tennesse from the Ktunaxa Nation spoke about the pipeline issues, straining their voices to be heard above the many honking horns.



Mad City Chickens - This Thursday, Oct 25th 2012

Mad City Chickens

As the second offering in the One Planet Film Series, Wildsight Kimberley/Cranbrook is pleased to be screening ‘Mad City Chickens’  - a sometimes serious, sometimes whimsical look at the people who keep urban chickens in their backyards . The film will be shown on  October 25th  in Cranbrook, and on October 26th in Kimberley.
 From chicken experts and authors to a rescued landfill hen and an inexperienced family that decides to take the poultry plunge—and even a mad professor and giant hen that take to the streets.  It’s a humorous and heartfelt trip through the world of backyard chickendom, that features coops, birds, eggs, art, a California musical hen, a Texas life-saving flock…and even a mad professor and a giant chicken that find their way into the mix.
“We're passionate about our ongoing food sustainability projects, and feel that the backyard chicken issue is one worth exploring in our communities." said Jessica Windle of Wildsight Kimberley Cranbrook.   "Keeping a flock of hens in the backyard is appealing to many households – chickens provide a source of fertilizer, pest control, and of course, fresh eggs.  There are also concerns about backyard chickens, primarily that chickens and their feed could become attractants for bears and other wildlife." 
Wildsight welcomes discussion from all community members on the topic, and will be holding a panel discussion immediately following the film, with local area residents on hand to answer your questions about raising chickens. "It is our hope that the film and discussion will stimulate the formation of a group that will look carefully into the potential of keeping backyard chickens in our communities."
‘Mad City Chickens’ will screen on Thursday, October 25th, at the College of the Rockies Lecture Theatre, and in Kimberley on Friday, October 26th at Centre 64.  Start time both evenings is 7:30 pm.   Admission is by donation, with chicken themed draw prizes to be won.  www.wildsight/kimcran

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Pipeline Opinions

Dear Livable Cranbrook,

             My name is Adrienne Campbell.  As part of a province wide day of action to Defend Our Coast and oppose pipelines and tankers on our coast, I’ve volunteered to host a local action at noon on Wednesday, October 24th at Bill Bennett’s constituency office, located at 100C Cranbrook Street North.  We’ll be linking arms and holding a banner that says “Defend Our Coast” to show the unbroken wall of opposition to pipelines and tankers across the province.

As a local community group, I wanted to let you know about the event, and also ask for your help in promoting it. This will be a peaceful gathering of citizens and community leaders and will not involve civil disobedience. Our goal is to achieve cross-partisan agreement for no new tanker expansion on BC's coast. The Liberals have shown some leadership by suggesting additional requirements for the Enbridge pipeline, but they have not yet supported a ban on new tankers. The NDP has shown leadership with a stronger position against the Enbridge pipeline, but they have not yet come out against the twinning of the Kinder Morgan pipeline which would increase tanker traffic on the BC coast. We would like both parties to come out strongly in favour of a BC-wide ban on new tankers, and the pipelines that would carry oil to the coast.

This province-wide day of action is being organized by Leadnow.ca and the Dogwood Initiatives. The media and Bill Bennett have been invited.

Date: Wednesday October 24th
Time: 12pm
Location: Bill Bennett’s office @ 100C Cranbrook Street North
Twitter hashtag: #DefendOurCoast

Adrienne Campbell

Coal, Garlic and Chinagate?

Why buy months old garlic from thousands of kilometres away when you can buy local, fresh garlic and support your own local economy as well as tread lighter on the environment?  Obama and Romney seem to have a lot to say about these issues.  It is no different in our own valleys.

Click to enlarge




From Frank Hastings

I thought unemployment was a problem in the north of B.C.  Why are we allowing foreign workers in to compete with our Elk Valley mines?  Doesn't anyone remember how the coal market caved in, in the 1980s, when they brought Tumbler Ridge on-stream?



Post Notes for the Council Meeting of October 22nd 2012

Announcement
Before proceedings Mayor Stetski announced the appointment of Wayne Staudt, formerly Director of Finance, as the City's Chief Administration Officer.  He was sworn in by Director Hales. 
Our Congratulations to CAO Staudt.

Delegations

5.1 Gary Dalton from ANKORS
Gary Dalton and Heidi Hebditch from Street Angels presented the problem of lack of available HIV and other blood related disease testing for up to 20 - 35% of the population of Cranbrook without a regular doctor.  The delegation asked that this issue be referred to the Family and Community Service Committee that they might draw up a list of recommendations for action. A motion to this effect was made by Councillor Davis.
Carried

5.2 Robyn Duncan and Helen Sander from Wildsight
Robyn Duncan presented an outline of the 15 year history and work accomplished by Wildsight.  She spoke of the many educational programs and the large number of school children in Cranbrook who have been exposed to the natural environment as a result.  The early leadership in recycling initiatives provided by Wildsight when it was still called East Kootenay Environmental Society was also brought to Council's attention. Duncan clearly stated that Wildsight is not a political organisation , is non-partisan and works with many different agencies of government.
Wildsight would like to work more with the City of Cranbrook and Helen Sander spoke of their wish to initiate the Clean Bin Project, a waste reduction program and asked for Council support.  Support was given to begin working on a Cranbrook Clean Bin project.

7.1 Administration Updates
The full report can be read at:
https://cranbrook.civicweb.net/Documents/DocumentList.aspx?ID=2559

-Concerns have been expressed about the audio levels of the City Council meetings when they are broadcast on SHAW Cable. The microphones are working and a recommendation has been made to the Mayor and Council to be 1 foot back from their mic's due to their sensitive nature. Staff will continue to monitor and make adjustments as needed
-Committee Meetings and Process; If a Committee wishes to initiate or explore a major item then they must seek Council's directions. If a member of the public wishes to have an item referred to a particular committee they must do so by writing to Council and requesting the matter to be referred. All Committees operate under a Terms of Reference (TOR) and the scope of a committees work is provided in the TOR
-CMHC and the City of Cranbrook are hosting a regional Housing Workshop and Luncheon on October 30 at the Manual Training Centre
-Canadian Rockies International Airport - Starting with the winter flight schedule Council is requiring the Restaurant Contractor to extend their hours and to ensure that the vending machines are fully stocked for customers on Saturdays
-Announcement of The Tragically Hip playing at the Western Financial Place on January 19, 2013

Correspondence
All correspondence can be read beginning:
https://cranbrook.civicweb.net/Documents/DocumentList.aspx?ID=2560
9.1 RDEK Highlights
9.2 Request for participants in the BC Youth Parliament
The deadline for these applications is today October 23rd.
9.3 Request for Cranbrook to take part in The Hello Pledge
9.4 Foster Family Month
9.5 Disability Without Poverty Network
9.6 Funding Request of $500 from the Contingency Fund to reduce participant costs for SQx Danza workshop.
Denied.
Councillor Whetham pointed out there is a framwork for the granting of such requests which are plentiful.  This request did not fit the criteria.  There was discussion on several occasions at this meeting of the constant requests such as this and the apparent need to tighten up procedure.
9.7 BC Aviation Council announcing the awarding of the William Templeton Award to the Canadian Rockies International Airport for aviation market development.
Mayor Stetski passed on Congratulations to Tristan Chernove.
9.8 Letter from Wildsight  on how they can best support Cranbrook in working towards environmental sustainability.
Councillor Davis requested more specific information which will be sent to him.
9.9 A letter from MADD to provide an overview of their upcoming initiatives
MADD made a requests for a special launch event to be held at City Hall and they asked Council to promote the display of red ribbons on city vehicles in support of MADD.  They also requested $500 to assist in the initiation of a 911 program.  This caused considerable discussion.  Council voted to hold the launch event and wait for more information on the 911 program
9.10  Letter from the EK Party Program requesting that the cost of renting the Manual Training Centre be waived
$250 granted towards the cost of the Manual Training Centre.
9.11 Request by the Legion to proclaim Nov. 5th-11, 2012 Veteran's Week.
Carried

Committee Recommendations

11.1 The Wellness and Heritage Committee is recommending a delay in the demolition of the brick building located behind City Hall until further information can be reviewed.
Councillor Warner presented some information about the unique construction of the building and reiterated the suggestion that maybe the building could be re purposed.


New Business

12.1 Appointments to Highway3/95 Revitalization Committee and Cranbrook in Motion Committee.
That Council amend the Terms of Reference of the Highway3/95 Committee to delete the representative from Kimberley Tourism and adjust the number of members to 9.
That Council appoint Pat Prefontaine as alternative representative of the RCMP on the Cranbrook in Motion Committee
Kareen Peters, Dave Butler (Tristan Chernove alt), Joey Hoeschman, Jeremy Youngward, Linda Birch and Clint Habart have been appointed to this committee.
12.2 To seek Council approval on proposed initiative for inclusion in the City of Cranbrook application to be named a Solar Community through SolarBC
Granted
12.3 To consider a referral from the RDEK for a proposed amendment to the Moyie and Area Land Use Bylaw No. 2070,2008.
Approved
12.4 To consider approval of an application for an Aquifer Protection Development Permit to enable consideration of development of a property located at 421 Patterson St. W.
Approved
12.5 To consider approval of an application for an Industrial Development Permit to enable development of a property located at 421 Patterson St. W.
Approved
12.6 To seek Council approval to participate in the 2013 Wood Stove Exchange Program with Wildsight Kimberley/Cranbrook.
Approved
12.7 To continue the Free Skate Agreement between the Kin-Club of Cranbrook for the provision of free public skating at designated hours
Approved

By-Laws

13.1 That Council adopt the Fire Fighting Equipment Short Term Capital Borrowing Bylaw No. 3756,2012
Approved This will enable the purchase of the new fire truck.
13.2 That Council adopt the City of Cranbrook Annual Taxation Exemption Bylaw. No. 3757,2012
Adopted
13.3 That Council give first, second and third readings to the 2013 Revenue Anticipation Borrowing Bylaw No.3758,2012 which will authorize borrowing up to $6,000,000 to cover cash flow requirement
All three readings Carried.  Although rarely used, the ability to borrow these funds acts as an emergency security. 
13.4 That Council give first, second, and third readings to Waterworks Amendment Bylaw No. 3759,2012 to increase monthly Water User Rates from $18 to $19
All three readings carried.

Monday, October 22, 2012

STORM WARNING

Internationally known experts on climate change and its implications, Bob Sandford and Deborah Harford will be in Cranbrook and Kimberley from October 24th to October 26th to discuss emerging water crises and treaties. 


Bob's credentials include:
- EPCOR Chair of the Canadian Partnership Initiative in support of the UN Water For Life Decade
- Advisory Committee for the Rosenberg International forum on Water Policy
- Director of the Western Watersheds Climate Research Collaborative
- Co-chair of the Forum for Leadership on Water
- Advisory Board of the Living Lakes Canada
- Advisory Panel RBC Blue Water Project
- co-researcher and author of Northern Voices, Southern Choices
- author of 25 books on water, history and ecological & cultural heritage



Deborah Harford is executive director with Simon Fraser’s Adaptation to Climate Change team.  Deborah’s work with ACT has gained her national recognition as a resource for those seeking information on climate change adaptation and practical coping strategies.

Citizens for a Livable Cranbrook are proud to be bringing these internationally known speakers to Cranbrook and Kimberley.  Along with their sponsors of Mainstreams, College of the Rockies and Wildsight they have coordinated several events over those three days.

On Wednesday October 24th both Bob and Deborah will be speaking at a public lecture at McKim Auditorium in Kimberley.  The title of their lecture will be Storm Warning – Assuring Water and Climate Security in a Changing West.  The topic of the Columbia River Treaty will also be included. Entry is by donation and this event begins at 6:30 pm for a book signing and refreshments.  Lecture at 7:30pm.

On Thursday October 25th, Cranbrook’s Mount Baker High School and the College of the Rockies will be venues for these speakers.  The lecture at the College of the Rockies from 1:00pm – 2:30pm will be open for all and will take place in Room 250 Kootenay Centre Lecture Theatre

Friday October 26th   From 9:00 – 10:00am these speakers will be at Selkirk School and the rest of the day has, at this time, been reserved for small group information sessions.These lecture topics will be combined at the lecture in Kimberley on Wednesday, Oct. 24th

Storm Warning:Assuring Water & Climate Security in a Changing West Rising mean temperatures are energizing the water cycle. Many of the established algorithms for forecasting how water will act in different circumstances no longer apply. We are entering a period in which water is going to do things we haven't seen it do before - for which no mathematics yet exist to make accurate predictive modelling possible. Examples from elsewhere in Canada suggest changes in the global water cycle have already begun to affect the hydrology of significant parts of the country with clear implications for everyone living downstream. In this highly graphic presentation, one of Canada's most respected water policy analysts will demonstrate what ecological impacts in combination with changes in snowpack, snow cover and glacial extent in the Rocky Mountains may mean to the climate of British Columbia and to the Columbia Basin in the future. 

A World Prematurely Dammed:Improving On The Columbia River Treaty & Other Hydrological Anachronisms While international water treaties have been existence for more than 400 years, exploding populations, growing water scarcity globally and eco-climatic change are testing all preconceptions about how such agreements need to be constructed in order to serve the common good and reduce the potential of conflict in periods of rapid and persistent change. The Columbia River Treaty is not the only major trans boundary agreement presently under critical scrutiny. By learning from others, it may be possible to prevent the Columbia River Treaty from becoming yet another anachronism that dooms everyone living under its terms and conditions to remaining frozen in the space and time in which it was crafted.



Advance Council Notes - October 22

Delegations

5.1 Gary Dalton from ANKORS

5.2 Robyn Duncan and Helen Sander from Wildsight

7.1 Administration Updates

-Concerns have been expressed about the audio levels of the City Council meetings when they are broadcast on SHAW Cable. The microphones are working and a recommendation has been made to the Mayor and Council to be 1 foot back from their mic's due to their sensitive nature. Staff will continue to monitor and make adjustments as needed
-Committee Meetings and Process; If a Committee wishes to initiate or explore a major item then they must seek Council's directions. If a member of the public wishes to have an item referred to a particular committee they must do so by writing to Council and requesting the matter to be referred. All Committees operate under a Terms of Reference (TOR) and the scope of a committees work is provided in the TOR
-CMHC and the City of Cranbrook are hosting a regional Housing Workshop and Luncheon on October 30 at the Manual Training Centre
-Canadian Rockies International Airport - Starting with the winter flight schedule Council is requiring the Restaurant Contractor to extend their hours and to ensure that the vending machines are fully stocked for customers on Saturdays
-Announcement of The Tragically Hip playing at the Western Financial Place on January 19, 2013

Correspondence

9.1 RDEK Highlights
9.2 Request for participants in the BC Youth Parliament
9.3 Request for Cranbrook to take part in The Hello Pledge
9.4 Foster Family Month
9.5 Disability Without Poverty Network
9.6 Funding Request of $500 from the Contingency Fund to reduce participant costs for SQx Danza workshop.
9.7 BC Aviation Council announcing the awarding of the William Templeton Award to the Canadian Rockies International Airport for aviation market development
9.8 Letter from Wildsight  on how they can best support Cranbrook in working towards environmental sustainability.
9.9 A letter from MADD to provide an overview of their upcoming initiatives
9.10  Letter from the EK Party Program requesting that the cost of renting the Manual Training Centre be waived
9.11 Request by the Legion to proclaim Nov. 5th-11, 2012 Veteran's Week.

Committee Recommendations

11.1 The Wellness and Heritage Committee is recommending a delay in the demolition of the brick building located behind City Hall until further information can be reviewed


New Business

12.1 Appointments to Highway3/95 Revitalization Committee and Cranbrook in Motion Committee.
That Council amend the Terms of Reference of the Highway3/95 Committee to delete the representative from Kimberley Tourism and adjust the number of members to 9.
That Council appoint Pat Prefontaine as alternative representative of the RCMP on the Cranbrook in Motion Committee
12.2 To seek Council approval on proposed initiative for inclusion in the City of Cranbrook application to be named a Solar Community through SolarBC
12.3 To consider a referral from the RDEK for a proposed amendment to the Moyie and Area Land Use Bylaw No. 2070,2008.
12.4 To consider approval of an application for an Aquifer Protection Development Permit to enable consideration of development of a property located at 421 Patterson St. W.
12.5 To consider approval of an application for an Industrial Development Permit to enable development of a property located at 421 Patterson St. W.
12.6 To seek Council approval to participate in the 2013 Wood Stove Exchange Program with Wildsight Kimberley/Cranbrook.
12.7 To continue the Free Skate Agreement between the Kin-Club of Cranbrook for the provision of free public skating at designated hours

By-Laws

13.1 That Council adopt the Fire Fighting Equipment Short Term Capital Borrowing Bylaw No. 3756,2012
13.2 That Council adopt the City of Cranbrook Annual Taxation Exemption Bylaw. No. 3757,2012
13.3 That Council give first, second and third readings to the 2013 Revenue Anticipation Borrowing Bylaw No.3758,2012 which will authorize borrowing up to $6,000,000 to cover cash flow requirement
13.4 That Council give first, second, and third readings to Waterworks Amendment Bylaw No. 3759,2012 to increase monthly Water User Rates from $18 to $19


Sunday, October 21, 2012

OCP and the Subdivision of Wetlands at Jimsmith Lake

submitted



The Rockyview Official Community Plan  (OCP) for Area C has fifteen references in it expressing an intent to protect the environment. Protection of the environment is policy of the RDEK Board and yet the wetlands at the west end of Jimsmith Lake were allowed to be subdivided into lots smaller than the regular rural residential lot size of 2 hectares. Houses will be built with septic drain fields close to the wetlands and some wetlands have been filled in.  Fortunately a number of these sensitive areas, but not all, have been detailed on a plan and covered by a ‘no disturb’ covenant in an attempt to preserve their integrity over the years.

Board approvals for this went through with little opposition and with no concessions made toward public input at the public hearing. The public input was almost entirely concerning maintenance of the wildlife habitat versus the density of human habitat. The Planning Department staff  provide technical advice to the board that is based on their interpretation of the Rural Residential zoning (R-Res) in the OCP as well as technical reports by professional consultants. These professional consultants are paid for and directed by the developer; there is no independent advice presented except at the public hearing. Plainly no notice was taken when the consequences of the impact of high density residential settlement on this sensitive ecosystem were pointed out at the public hearing. If the consequences had been understood they would have applied other clauses in the OCP that provide much better environmental protection and allow a similar end product.

This is no reflection on the developer, he went through the required hoops that the planning staff set up for him and the work has proceeded in a professional manner. There are a small number of minor deviations that might come to haunt us, but few of us are perfect.

The problem lies with the OCP zoning and its interpretation. By designating this area as Rural Residential
 (R-Res) the new OCP enables lot sizes from 1ha to 8 ha.  What developer in his right senses is going to make larger lots than he has to? And yet an earlier (2010) subdivision in rough bush, upland from the lake, had 10 - 2ha lots.  The irony here is that an area with 2ha lots that is suitable for smaller lots is right next to the new area, now subdivided into smaller lots, less able to absorb a higher density of humanity without damage, than the original lots by the same developer.  According to the planners the developer mitigated the intrusion on the wetlands with a “no disturb” covenant because it is described as a Development Permit Area in the OCP and was rewarded with the incentive of 1ha lots because he made extra efforts.  But the Development Permit enables the smaller lot size.  The covenant, which will run with the land, is as effective as the RDEK compliance officer and for as long as the owners respect it: The compliance officer covers the whole region and looks after all reported bylaw contraventions.

The planning staff depended heavily on the Environmental Assessment Report (EAR), paid for by the developer, which stated that there would be only minor impact on the environment.  But this report did not note the full extent of existing wetlands; did not recognize the habitat value of a pond that used to be wetland, until a previous owner dug it out; did not recognize a creek that allegedly had been dug out and straightened but is now partially filled in and needs protection as part of the wetland system.  This is not to say that the EAR is not a valid document – it was written by highly competent biologists and covers a number of technical details such as establishing a safety zone around some of the wetlands themselves. But there is no mention of the wildlife corridors that will be shut off by smaller fenced lots or the impacts of higher housing density on water quality.

Interpretation of the OCP is critical. We can expect more of the same as long as the planners do not feel that they must represent the interest of the public rather than proposed inappropriate economic activity. The planners need to be better informed on the environmental impact of their actions. There are clauses in the OCP that enable more rigorous procedures to deal with such highly sensitive property if they want to apply them. The planners have the authority of Board policy to ensure the highest and best protection is enabled but, despite having the authority, it was too difficult for them to persuade the developer to accept a more expensive mitigation plan. There is now a precedent set for future sensitive subdivision proposals unless citizens express their disgust at this desecration of our environment inthe Area  C.



In order to make your concerns known and to ensure that other areas of sensitive habitat is protected in accordance with RDEK Board policy. Please be sure to write or e-mail Mr. Gay at the RDEK office.

Contact Brian Passey,  Jimsmith Lake
numscull@shaw.ca   for more information

More Autumn Brilliance












The walk through Moe's Canyon off Kimberley Ski Hill is always a delight when the Larch are at their prime.

Saturday, October 20, 2012

Around Town this Week and Looking Brilliant

15th St 
'Clara Curtis' Chrysanthemum
Cotoneaster
Last of the Red Currants
Maple leaf in transition
Ginnala Maple leaves
Michaelmas Daisy and late flowering Monkshood

Mountain Ash
Rotary Trail

Friday, October 19, 2012

A hike in the Grand Canyon makes one think

Perceptions by Gerry Warner

In a world where 15-year-olds are being bullied to death, presidential candidates vie to see who can be rudest in front of the camera and the greatest of sports icons are revealed to be frauds, sometimes you’ve just got to get away.
And that’s what I did the past two weeks. I got away to one of the grandest places of all and you can do it too. Just point your vehicle south and drive over a thousand miles on Highway 93 – surely one of the loneliest highways in the world – and you’ll arrive at the heavily-forested Kaibab Plateau more than 8,000 feet high and staring down from the north rim into of one of the greatest chasms on earth – the   Grand Canyon.
That initial look at the vastness below, the red and ochre cliffs rising like stone temples, the ancient limestone walls surrounding them and the lacy ribbon of the Colorado River shimmering in the deep shadows of the grey inner canyon rock almost two billion years old – well if that doesn’t take the cares of this woeful world off your heavy shoulders – then nothing will.
And so it was about a week ago when I heaved on my overnight pack and began what seemed like a million-step journey from the north to the south rims of the great gash in the earth’s crust that geologists say is at least 1.6 billion years old and studded with fossil remains to prove its unfathomable longevity. And believe me these numbers are as unfathomable to a mere mortal like yours truly as is the grandeur of the canyon itself . The reading material I brought with me said every step down you take down in the Grand Canyon is the equivalent of going back 100,000 years in time.
Try to fathom that one?
This means that in less than a step below the North Rim you’re back in time way beyond the pyramids and when you complete the step you’re already past the Neanderthals, the very ancestors of the human race. In about a kilometer, you’re walking with the dinosaurs and by the time you’ve hit the bottom of the canyon you’re more than half way to the first one-celled creatures that climbed out of the  primordial ooze about four billion years after the origin of the earth. And you’ve  done all this before curling up at night and watching the stars from the canyon floor.
Personally, I took some comfort in the fact that the geologists themselves differ greatly on the age of the Grand Canyon and how it even originated. The majority believe in the “Young Canyon” theory, placing the great rift in the earth’s crust at about 6 million years old while others think it could be as old as 70 million years with the rock layers themselves going back eons longer. The geological experts also disagree on the role the Colorado River played in the Canyon’s formation. Did the uplifting of the Kaibab Formation come first and the river later carved its way down or was the river already there cutting through the giant upwelling of rock as it rose? Oddly enough, almost all geologists agree there’s evidence that the Colorado River once flowed north-east, the opposite of what it flows now. How confusing can it get?
But I don’t think the Grand Canyon is meant to be understood. I’ll leave that to the geologists. In my view, the canyon is meant to be enjoyed and you can’t go wrong doing that. In the evening as the sun sets on the rim and light dances on the craggy buttes turning them into giant pyramids rising from the deep shadows below, it’s nothing short of magical. Then, in a few minutes, the light is gone and a faint orange glow settles over the vast panorama leaving only ghostly silhouettes etched against the sky and an endless canopy of stars twinkling over the darkened abyss beneath. 
It’s enough to make an atheist think twice and the religious more faithful. As for the woes of the world, they’ll no doubt stay. But a visit to the Grand Canyon may make them a little more bearable.


 Gerry Warner is a retired journalist and Cranbrook City Councillor. His views are his own. 

Thursday, October 18, 2012

What's Happening...

Thursday, October 18

Interior Health Flu Clinic at the Tamarack Mall
From 9am to 5:30 pm
Flu shots are free for Seniors, residents of nursing homes,
adults and children with chronic health conditions and children
from 6 to 59 months of age. Two additional flu shot clinics will be held on 
Wednesday, October 24th and Friday, October 26th

Friday, October 19

Calling all Seniors interested in shopping online or using Facebook
CBAL host a series of 1.5hr sessions on these topics at the Cranbrook
Public Library. Next session starts today at 10:30am
To register call Katherine at 250-417-2896.

CMHA Chocolate Fundraiser
Tickets are $20 in advance and $25 at the door
Includes 2 glasses of wine and dessert tasting
Heritage Inn at 7:30pm
Call 250-426-5222 for more information

Saturday, October 20

A Taste of Blacksmithing
Reimer & Co. Blacksmith Shop is holding a one on one instruction in blacksmithing
Teaching projects geared to all levels.
Contact Paul Reimer for further information at 250-489-9888

Wednesday, October 24

Storm Warning; Water Security in a Changing West
A joint presentation by Bob Sanford and Deborah Hartford
at the McKim Theatre in Kimberley.
Starts at 6:30 with refreshments
Admission  by donation.

Michelle Wright at the Key City Theatre
Concert starts at 7:30pm, Tickets are $40
Available at the KCT Box office.



Water Crisis Real or Not? STORM WARNING

Storm Warning with Bob Sandford and Deborah HarfordInternationally known experts on climate change and its implications, Bob Sanford and Deborah Harford will be in Cranbrook and Kimberley from October 24th to October 26th to discuss emerging water crises and treaties.  Bob Sandford is the EPCOR Chair of the Canadian Partnership Initiative in support of United Nations “Water for Life” Decade.  Bob also sits on the Advisory Committee for the prestigious Rosenberg International Forum on Water Policy.
He holds many other prestigious positions.    Deborah Harford is executive director with Simon Fraser’s Adaptation to Climate Change team.  Deborah’s work with ACT has gained her national recognition as a resource for those seeking information on climate change adaptation and practical coping strategies.
Citizens for a Livable Cranbrook are proud to be bringing these internationally known speakers to Cranbrook and Kimberley.  Along with their sponsors of Mainstreams, College of the Rockies and Wildsight they have coordinated several events over those three days.On Wednesday October 24th both Bob and Deborah will be speaking at a public lecture at McKim Auditorium in Kimberley.  The title of their lecture will be Storm Warning – Assuring Water and Climate Security in a Changing West.  The topic of the Columbia River Treaty will also be included. Entry is by donation and this event begins at 6:30 pm for a book signing and refreshments.  Lecture at 7:30pm.On Thursday October 25th, Cranbrook’s Mount Baker High School and the College of the Rockies will be venues for these speakers.  The lecture at the College of the Rockies from 1:00pm – 2:30pm will be open for all and will take place in Room 250 Kootenay Centre Lecture TheatreFriday October 26th  9:00am -10:00am Selkirk School and at this time, the rest of the day has been reserved for small group information sessions.


Wednesday, October 17, 2012

Healthy Waters for Healthy Communities

On October 24th and 25th Cranbrook and Kimberley will be host to two internationally known scientists whose speciality is the state of the world's water.  Bob Sandford and Deborah Harford will be presenting a public lecture at McKim Auditorium Kimberley on October 24th.  Details on sidebar.

This Wildsight Project below is just one example of many projects being undertaken by many Canadian communities.  Our own Cranbrook Connected study named water as the number one topic of concern for Cranbrook residents.

Bob Sandford and Deborah Harford will help to shed light on the many issues surrounding water including issues we may wish to think about concerning our Columbia Basin Treaty which is under review.

Tuesday, October 16, 2012

Around Town and Looking Good, Cranbrook in Bloom's Final Project


The last of Cranbrook in Bloom's projects, Centennial Three Garden will soon be complete.  As always, these improvements to our city's  appearance could not be undertaken without much work by the city public works department.  The committee which makes up Cranbrook in Bloom has completed many projects over a period of approximately ten years and it is with some regret the committee has decided to make this their final project.  Design, fundraising, digging multiple holes, and much grunt work has been their work over this time span.

The beautification projects began when the Cranbrook Garden Club, fifteen years ago, initiated an Open Garden Day. In the first year, the proceeds were divided between several projects but eventually and for several years all proceeds were donated to setting up the hanging basket program. The Cranbrook Garden Club's initiatives eventually helped to fund projects undertaken by the Communities in Bloom Committee which formed after the hanging basket program had been initiated and then after several years of entering this formal judged competition it was decided to revert to a simple Cranbrook in Bloom committee.  Proceeds from the Cranbrook Garden Club's Open Garden Day have consistently helped to fund the many projects (including the Centennial Three Garden), undertaken by both the Cranbrook and Communities in Bloom Committees. Along with the Garden Club, the medical profession, the City, the Downtown Business Association, service clubs and many granting organisations, these improvements have been made possible.  The City now has an Urban Forestry Plan, many more plantings to look after, more horticultural staff and a renewed pride.

It is anticipated Cranbrook in Bloom will be making a formal presentation about their work to City Council early next year.

Close to this date fifteen years ago.....click to enlarge





Monday, October 15, 2012

NDP Celebrates Local Food at Harvest Fund Raising Dinner



Kootenay East NDP candidate Norma Blissett told the sell-out crowd at the Oct. 12 Local Food Harvest Dinner, “Buying and eating local food is good for our local economy, the environment and for our bodies and souls. We had a regional conference back in the spring and talked about a variety of local initiatives that were happening in the Kootenays.  Part of that was about supporting local agriculture and so when it came to organizing a fund raising dinner we went with the concept of a local harvest supper, where we could support a wonderful local chef and eat healthy, tasty local food, decrease our impact on the environment, support local farmers and raise some money in the process. What more could you ask for?”

Thomas of Allegra Restaurant catered the event, which featured a menu of locally supplied food.  Beef was provided by Kootenay All Natural Beef Company, Wycliffe, Chicken came from Meyers of Creston.  Christian Kimber of Three Crows Farms, Cranbrook, Fort Steele Farms and Truscott Farm of Creston supplied fresh produce.  The event also included a silent auction and jazz music by The Don Davies Quartet.

In a week when two speakers are coming to Cranbrook to talk about the 10% shift concept, this dinner was a practical example of how to support the local economy by supporting local suppliers and small business.  The 10% shift movement asks people to keep at least 10% of their spending to local products and business.  

CUPE BC’s Ten Percent Shift campaign coming to Cranbrook October 17

Cranbrook, BC -- If every community member shifted ten percent of their household purchases to “local first,” it would strengthen our community and benefit Cranbrook’s local businesses.
That’s the message that CUPE BC President Barry O’Neill will be bringing to Cranbrook on  Wednesday, October 17th at 7 pm. The event is co-sponsored by CUPE BC and CUPE Local 2773 (College of the Rockies support staff) and will be held in room S207 at the College of the Rockies.
This event is a chance to have a conversation about the importance of local first, and about the impact that our choice to spend online or in other communities has on our local economy.  This event is about the conversation, not about telling people where to shop or how to spend their hard earned dollars.  This will build on many other initiatives that highlight the community wide benefits to spending in our community. Another key point in the conversation that O’Neill will be leading on the 17th is that local spending isn’t about unfair costs to the consumer. If you can’t get the good deal or locally is only poor quality, then don’t go. The goal is to find ways that average people can support our local economy.

For more information please visit the website www.tenpercentshift.ca where visitors are challenged to take the “Ten Percent Shift Pledge”. The website also has information and ideas for shifting your spending towards local first.

For more information, please contact:
Jordan Osiowy
250-489-2751 local 3555



Sunday, October 14, 2012